Veteran gay rights protester, 74, who was at 1969 Stonewall Riots is attacked by pro-trans mob at Pride event for sign dismissing transgenderism as 'Woman Face'

Sep 21, 22
Veteran gay rights protester, 74, who was at 1969 Stonewall Riots is attacked by pro-trans mob at Pride event for sign dismissing transgenderism as 'Woman Face'

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Sargeant is famously known in the gay rights movement and was a co-founder of the first 1970 pride parade in New York City known as the Christopher Street Liberation Day march 

A gay rights protestor and co-founder of the first Gay Pride Parade in New York City was attacked by a pro-trans group at a Vermont Pride event for holding an anti-woke sign that dismissed transgenderism.

Fred Sargeant, 74, was attacked after holding a sign with a red line through the phrases 'Woman Face' and 'Black Face,' at the 39th Burlington Pride Parade in Vermont.

Sargeant is against the recent 'gender ideology movement' which he says is 'homophobic' and 'exclusive.'

'Mugged at Burlington Pride,' Sargeant wrote on Facebook. 'So, I went to Pride to protest their misogyny, homophobia, exclusionary policies and divisiveness. I was met by screaming, multiple assaults, ageist comments, shoving, slaps to the back of my head, pouring coffee on me and repeated attempts to steal my signs.

'Being unsuccessful in their attempts to disrupt my protest and drive me away, the mob pushed me to the ground as the parade ended, further injuring me.'

He concluded while posting a photo of his controversial sign: 'They stole or damaged more than $550 worth of my property. This is the sign that the young trans/rainbow brownshirts in dresses went absolutely nuts over.'

Sargeant has been an advocate for gay rights since he participated in the six-day Stonewall Riots of 1969 and co-led the first pride parade in New York City known as the Christopher Street Liberation Day march.

Fred Sargeant, 74, was attacked at a pride event after holding a sign that crossed out the words, 'Woman face' and 'Black face,' while at the 39th Burlington Pride Parade in Vermont

Fred Sargeant, 74, was attacked at a pride event after holding a sign that crossed out the words, 'Woman face' and 'Black face,' while at the 39th Burlington Pride Parade in Vermont

Sargeant posted various photos of the protest and his attackers. One of his signs read, 'GAY NOT QUEER

Sargeant posted various photos of the protest and his attackers. One of his signs read, 'GAY NOT QUEER

Pride parade attenders attempted to take Sargeant's sign away from him as he stood in the middle of a crowd

Pride parade attenders attempted to take Sargeant's sign away from him as he stood in the middle of a crowd

One person knocked him to the ground amid multiple slaps to his body

One person knocked him to the ground amid multiple slaps to his body

A woman was seen attempting to take Sargeant's sign away as one man attempted to intervene

A woman was seen attempting to take Sargeant's sign away as one man attempted to intervene 

A crowd formed a circle around Sargeant and the unidentified woman while the brawl occurred

A crowd formed a circle around Sargeant and the unidentified woman while the brawl occurred

Sargeant's sign had this message

Sargeant's sign had this message

The unidentified woman insisted she didn't hurt him before walking away

The unidentified woman insisted she didn't hurt him before walking away 

Sargeant showed one of the attacks on a video as a mob with pride flags gathered around.

'What are you doing?' one man is heard shouting at a woman attempting to snatch Sargeant's poster.

'You realize you're assaulting him,' she adds as the two are seen in a struggle.

The woman let go of the sign and added, 'So, I'm not hurting him.'

Sargeant posted the footage on Facebook and shared encouraging messages he received in response. Some were from struggling 'detransitioners' and others were from upset 'gay' fans.

'I'm a woman [and] lesbian,' one person from Chile wrote. 'I detransitioned three years ago. It's been a rough time... I want to say thank you for all that you have done. 

Another added, 'I caught wind of the ghouls who assaulted you at the Pride event in Vermont. All I want to say is that I hope you know not all young people are down with the LGBTQABCDEFG nonsense. 

'I myself am fed up with it. I'm fed up with my self-hating peers wither trying to convince me to transition, or presuming I already am in the process. I'm tired of local LBGT organizations pandering to trans people and not having lesbian or gay male support groups. 

'I'm tired of how boring my peers are with their thinking that cutting up their bodies means "subverting gender." I sometimes wish I didn't know my history, so that I could stop hoping the community and camaraderie will be anything like it was in the 90s and earlier.' 

Sargeant has spent decades establishing rights for gay and lesbian people - but fears the efforts have been overcome by radical people in the LGBTQ+ community

Sargeant has spent decades establishing rights for gay and lesbian people - but fears the efforts have been overcome by radical people in the LGBTQ+ community

The 1969 police raid on New York's Stonewall Inn (pictured) sparked the LGBT rights movement . Picture credit: Stonewall Uprising

The 1969 police raid on New York's Stonewall Inn (pictured) sparked the LGBT rights movement . Picture credit: Stonewall Uprising

Activists are pictured gathering outside the Stonewall Inn two years after the riots  in 1971, in order to push for gay rights

Activists are pictured gathering outside the Stonewall Inn two years after the riots  in 1971, in order to push for gay rights

In 2016, the Stonewall Inn was designated as a National Historic Landmark and a Monument was opened across the road

In 2016, the Stonewall Inn was designated as a National Historic Landmark and a Monument was opened across the road

NYC's historic Stonewall Inn is named a national monument in 2016

 

Sargeant has spent decades establishing rights for gay and lesbian people - but fears the efforts have been overcome by radical people in the LGBTQ+ community.

The veteran gay rights protestor was quick to participate in the six-day Stonewall Riots of 1969. The riots broke out in the summertime after the New York City Police Department raided the Stonewall Inn and pulled people out.

He happened to stumble upon the first day of the riot on June 28, 1969 after leaving dinner with friends, according to PBS. 

A year later, Sargeant organized the first pride march in New York City known as the Christopher Street Liberation Day march held in June 1970. 

After witnessing the events at Stonewall, Sargeant pledged to become a police officer in Connecticut in 1973. He embarked on a leadership journey to promote change in the force. 

Sargeant is continuously recognized for his work and was recognized in 2019 for his work at Stonewall by the Association des Journalists LGBTQI+'s OUT d'or Awards in Paris, according to his website.

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